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Metabolic Complications and Kidney Transplantation: Focus on Glycaemia and Dyslipidaemia

Author(s):

Panagiotis Anagnostis*, Stavroula Α. Paschou, Eleftherios Spartalis, Gerardo Sarno, Paride De Rosa and Giovanna Muscogiuri   Pages 1 - 9 ( 9 )

Abstract:


Post-transplant diabetes mellitus (PTDM) and dyslipidaemia are the most common metabolic complications in kidney transplant recipients (KTR). They are associated with a higher risk of lower graft function and survival, as well as increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this review is to provide current data on the epidemiology, pathophysiology and optimal management of these two principal metabolic complications in KTR. Several risk factors in this metabolic milieu are already present before or emerge after renal transplantation, such as those due to immunosuppressive therapy. However, the exact pathogenic mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Awareness of these disorders is crucial to estimate CVD risk in KTR and optimize screening and therapeutic strategies. These include lifestyle (preferably according to the Mediterranean pattern) and immunosuppressive regimen modification as well as the best available anti-diabetic (insulin or oral hypoglycaemic agents) and hypolipidaemic (e.g. statins) regimen according individual metabolic profile and medical history.

Keywords:

Kidney transplant; Post-transplant diabetes mellitus; Dyslipidaemia; Cardiovascular risk; Immunosuppressive therapy.

Affiliation:

Unit of Reproductive Endocrinology, First Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Division of Endocrinology and Diabetes, “Aghia Sophia” Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Laboratory of Experimental Surgery and Surgical Research, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, General Surgery and Kidney Transplantation Unit, “San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona University Hospital”, Salerno, General Surgery and Kidney Transplantation Unit, “San Giovanni di Dio e Ruggi d’Aragona University Hospital”, Salerno, Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University, Naples



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