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Endothelial and Cardiac Dysfunction in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases: Does Treatment Modify the Inflammatory Load on Arterial and Cardiac Structure and Function?

Author(s):

Charilaos Triantafyllou *, Maria Nikolaou, Ignatios Ikonomidis, Giorgos Bamias and Ioannis Papaconstantinou   Pages 1 - 11 ( 11 )

Abstract:


Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), largely represented by Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), alter gastrointestinal physiology and mucosal immunity through a complex inflammatory process. These diseases can lead to significant arterial endothelial dysfunction. There is also evidence linking IBD with a modification of cardiac structure and function. A growing body of research has associated IBD with an acceleration of arterial stiffness and atherosclerosis and an increased risk of cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality. The focus of this review is two-fold. Firstly, the literature on IBD in relation to CV dysfunction was evaluated (mainly based on 25 relevant surveys carried out between 2005 and 2018). The vast majority of these studies support a significant association of IBD with a deterioration in CV function. Secondly, the literature available regarding the effect of IBD treatment on CV dysfunction was considered based on studies published between 2007 and 2018. This literature search suggests that IBD treatment may have the potential to ameliorate CV dysfunction resulting in CV benefits. This review will analyse the literature as well as consider emerging research perspectives regarding how IBD treatment could improve CV dysfunction.

Keywords:

inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis, endothelial glycocalyx, arterial stiffness

Affiliation:

Department of Cardiology, Amalia Fleming General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Department of Cardiology, Amalia Fleming General Hospital of Athens, Athens, 2nd Academic Department of Cardiology, Attikon Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, GI-Unit, 3rd Academic Department of Internal Medicine, Sotiria Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, 2nd Academic Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens



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