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Maternal Dyslipidaemia in Pregnancy with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Impact on Foetoplacental Vascular Function and Lipoproteins in the Neonatal Circulation

[ Vol. 17 , Issue. 1 ]

Author(s):

Susana Contreras-Duarte, Lorena Carvajal, Barbara Fuenzalida, Claudette Cantin, Luis Sobrevia and Andrea Leiva*   Pages 52 - 71 ( 20 )

Abstract:


Dyslipidaemia occurs in pregnancy to secure foetal development. The mother shows a physiological increase in plasma total cholesterol and Triglycerides (TG) as pregnancy progresses (i.e. maternal physiological dyslipidaemia in pregnancy). However, in some women pregnancy-associated dyslipidaemia exceeds this physiological adaptation. The consequences of this condition on the developing fetus include endothelial dysfunction of the foetoplacental vasculature and development of foetal aortic atherosclerosis. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) associates with abnormal function of the foetoplacental vasculature due to foetal hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia, and associates with development of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Supraphysiological dyslipidaemia is also detected in GDM pregnancies. Although there are several studies showing the alteration in the maternal and neonatal lipid profile in GDM pregnancies, there are no studies addressing the effect of dyslipidaemia in the maternal and foetal vasculature. The literature reviewed suggests that dyslipidaemia in GDM pregnancy should be an additional factor contributing to worsen GDM-associated endothelial dysfunction by altering signalling pathways involving nitric oxide bioavailability and neonatal lipoproteins.

Keywords:

Dyslipidaemia, gestational diabetes, endothelium, lipoprotein, pregnancy.

Affiliation:

Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 8330024, Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 8330024, Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 8330024, Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 8330024, Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 8330024, Cellular and Molecular Physiology Laboratory (CMPL), Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, Santiago 8330024



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