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Effect of Ranolazine in Preventing Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation in Patients Undergoing Coronary Revascularization Surgery

[ Vol. 11 , Issue. 6 ]

Author(s):

Georgios I. Tagarakis, Isaac Aidonidis, Stella S. Daskalopoulou, Vassilios Simopoulos, Vassilios Liouras, Marios E. Daskalopoulos, Charalampos Parisis, Kiriaki Papageorgiou, Ioannis Skoularingis, Filippos Triposkiadis, Paschalis-Adam Molyvdas and Nikolaos B. Tsilimingas   Pages 988 - 991 ( 4 )

Abstract:


Background/Objective: Ranolazine is a new anti-ischemic agent approved for chronic angina with additional electrophysiologic properties. The purpose of the present trial was to investigate its effect in preventing postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) after on-pump coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery.

Methods: In the current prospective, randomized, (1 active: 2 control), single-blind (outcome assessors), single-centre clinical trial we recruited consecutive eligible patients scheduled for elective on-pump CABG. Participants were assigned to receive either oral ranolazine 375 mg twice daily for 3 days prior to surgery and until discharge, or to receive usual care. Patients were monitored for the development of POAF.

Results: We enrolled 102 patients. Significantly lower incidence of POAF was noted in the ranolazine group compared with the control group (3 out of 34 patients, 8.8%, vs 21 out of 68 patients, 30.8%; p< 0.001). Mean values of left atrial diameter and left ventricular ejection fraction between the control and the ranolazine group were not significantly different.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest a protective role of oral ranolazine when administered in a moderate dose preoperatively in patients undergoing on-pump CABG surgery. Future studies based on a wider sample of patients will eventually support our conclusions.

Keywords:

Ranolazine, atrial fibrillation, postoperative, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, prevention.

Affiliation:

Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery University of Thessaly, Larissa, Greece.



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